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10:00
10:00
30min
How Do We Design Secure Protocols?
Aaron Feickert

When we look at cryptographic protocols like CLSAG and Bulletproofs and Triptych and Seraphis, we often talk about things like security models and proofs. But what does this mean?

In this talk, we'll take a brief look at what it means to build a secure cryptographic protocol and analyze it. Taking a Monero-centric approach, we'll introduce the idea of a security model and use examples from the Monero ecosystem to show why it's an important part of analyzing these constructions.

This talk will be accessible to everyone, and will provide a broad look at what cryptographers do behind the scenes to keep Monero safe and secure.

Studio 1
10:50
10:50
30min
Privacy as a Kantian-Misesian a priori condition for the preservation of property rights
andrea

This presentation analyzes the relation between the philosophical notion of privacy, its practical implementation in the domain of cryptocurrencies, and the Western regulatory financial environment. A libertarian (anarcho-capitalist, agorist) perspective is adopted.
The ability of governments to extract resources from the economy depends on their ability to surveil it: property that is not seen by authorities cannot be taxed. Privacy-preserving cryptocurrencies such as Monero pose a special danger to the state because they allow buyers and sellers to interact directly without relying on regulated financial institutions, thus bolstering black (free) markets. It comes as no surprise, then, that regulators are cracking down on privacy-centric crypto projects, as shown by the Tornado Cash saga.
Oddly enough, the clamp down on Tornado Cash elicited only a mild response in the cryptocurrency ecosystem. For example, the focus of proposals like Privacy Pools is on finding a practical equilibrium between the preservation of privacy and regulatory compliance without challenging the ability of the state to define the rules of the game. In order to understand why this appeasement strategy cannot work, a proper philosophical debate on the nature of privacy needs to be carried out.
The main objective of this presentation is to investigate what kind of theoretical notion privacy is. Utilitarianism, privacy as a natural right, and privacy as a Kantian-Misesian a priori condition for the preservation of property rights are analyzed. Firstly, it is shown that utilitarian (relativistic) approaches do not work because they end up outsourcing the definition of privacy to the government; the powerful, not utilitarians, get to define the costs and benefits of privacy and surveillance. Secondly, the theory of privacy as a natural right is interesting because it does not depend on the arbitrary wishes of politicians and bureaucrats, but it is discarded because it is not compatible with libertarian reductionism, which correctly holds that property is the only natural right. Moreover, privacy is more of a fight than a right. Thirdly, the main proposal of this presentation is to understand privacy as a Kantian-Misesian a priori condition for the preservation of property: that privacy is required to safeguard property is an a priori truth that does not depend on empirical circumstances. This proposal is coherent with libertarian reductionism because privacy is not interpreted as a natural right; in parallel, it is superior to utilitarianism because the a priori status of privacy protects it from human arbitrariness. While the origin of a priori notions is not empirical, their use is: privacy cannot but impact how the acting man protects real-world property and interacts with fellow human beings. The Kantian-Misesian approach leads to the rejection of self-defeating appeasement strategies and to the adoption of a much more effective adversarial mindset.

Studio 1
11:40
11:40
20min
Serai: Decentralizing Exchanges for Monero
Luke 'Kayaba' Parker

This talk will be an introduction and overview for Serai, a decentralized exchange which will support Monero at launch.

Studio 1
14:00
14:00
60min
Building a NextJS Webapp with Monero-ts
AlexAnarcho

Building a web app with NextJS and implement a Monero Payment Solution in 60 minutes.
We use t3 stack for modern web development and learn to use monero-typescript to integrate XMR into the app.

IoC
14:00
20min
SimpleX Chat - the first messaging platform without user IDs aiming to bridge the gap between privacy-focussed and mass-market applications.
Evgeny Poberezkin

SimpleX Chat (https://simplex.chat/) is the messaging network based on the novel protocol design where users are not assigned any identities, not even random numbers.

It allows users to communicate, privately and anonymously, over messaging relays. Unlike federated networks, where servers host users' accounts, messaging relays are "dumb" - they use anonymous client generated credentials to provide disposable messaging queues, without knowing any users of the network. Unlike mix- and onion-routing networks, SimpleX relays don't communicate directly with each other and don't know about each other existence - clients' themselves form a network. This unique design may provide a higher level of privacy and resilience than traditional federated and p2p network designs.

Monero community has been very supportive of SimpleX Chat design and growth, as the values of privacy and protecting participant identities are shared.

Evgeny, SimpleX Chat founder will also talk about the evolution of SimpleX Chat protocols, how it increased privacy and security since it launched, and also why it's very important that privacy and security becomes a hygiene factor for mass-market technology solutions, and not a product category - real privacy is only possible in the network that is used by a large number of people.

Studio 1
14:40
14:40
20min
An Update on Full Chain Membership Proofs
Luke 'Kayaba' Parker

This talk will provide an update on the work performed for Full Chain Membership Proofs over the past year.

Studio 1
15:20
15:20
20min
Aura: Using Privacy-Respecting Technology to Build Secure Voting
Aaron Feickert

Electronic voting is hard. Really hard! Existing approaches to this problem make many tradeoffs, like leaking voter information or trusting voting authorities not to cheat. What we want is a way to conduct a vote electronically that respects voter privacy, allows anyone to verify the results are correct, and minimizes trust in voting and tallying authorities.

This talk will introduce Aura, a voting protocol that meets these goals. Aura uses several privacy-respecting techniques (including some from private transaction protocols!) to do this. We'll provide a high-level overview of how it works and why it's useful.

This talk should be accessible to everyone, and no particular technical background is assumed.

Studio 1
15:20
60min
SimpleX Chat - the first messaging platform without user IDs - how to setup dual-host messaging and file servers with both clearnet and .onion address.
Evgeny Poberezkin

SimpleX Chat (https://simplex.chat/) is the messaging network based on the novel protocol design where users are not assigned any identities, not even random numbers.

It allows users to communicate, privately and anonymously, over messaging relays. This unique design may provide a higher level of privacy and resilience than traditional federated and p2p network designs.

In this workshop we will install file and messaging servers and Tor client, to use them with SimpleX Chat client, without any dependency on our preset servers.

IoC
16:00
16:00
20min
Filter-Assist Keys and Flexible View-Tags: More Private and Adjustable Light Wallets
jeffro256

New updates to the Jamtis addressing protocol would allow for a tier of light wallets with even greater privacy guarantees and scaling benefits. Before these changes, light wallet servers could tell a client received funds if those funds were sent twice to the same Jamtis address. They could also tell if a client received funds if those funds were sent to a Jamtis address known to the light wallet server. Finally, a light wallet server could identify churning and pocket-change style transactions of the client with high probability. Recent developments to Jamtis fix all those privacy issues, hopefully paving the way for (almost) totally non-deterministic light wallet implementations. In addition to privacy boosts, the addition of "flexible view-tags" provide the ability for the community to react to scaling concerns regarding light wallets, adjusting the balance between privacy and computation demands, without requiring network updates. We discuss the pros/cons of these changes in detail, what is theoretically still left to solve, as well as how these changes could enable real-world use cases.

Studio 1
10:00
10:00
30min
Unorthodox Cryptography to Scale Monero
Luke 'Kayaba' Parker

Monero is expected to evolve to Seraphis, adopt JAMTIS as our new address scheme, and even adopt Full Chain Membership Proofs for complete sender privacy. All of these rely on Elliptic Curve Cryptography, with the most notable construction being the curve cycle (an elliptic curve whose scalar field embeds the field of an elliptic curve whose scalar field is the original curve's field) proposed.

This talk will go over alternate cryptographic schemes which can offer a more performant membership proof, decrease the storage requirements of Monero, eliminate the need to iteratively scan transactions for near-instant scan times, and increase privacy for users who don't run their own nodes.

Studio 1
14:00
14:00
30min
Private Smart Contracts: Bringing Programmibility to Monero
Luke 'Kayaba' Parker

Smart contracts are a frequent request for Monero, yet have significant questions about privacy, efficiency, and complexity. Any VM would have several pages for its specification, with opcodes debatable for years. The denial of service risk would threaten Monero's stability, and the lack of privacy seen with most VMs would be unacceptable.

This talk will establish and go over a potential evolution for the protocol, where smart contracts are expressed in algebraic terms (creating a pure specification) and evaluated in constant time (being without a denial of service risk) while maintaining privacy of the contract code, inputs, and execution without a trusted setup.

Studio 1
No sessions on Sunday, June 9, 2024.